Install Theme

Souls of San Francisco

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“I’m opening a restaurant over in the Tenderloin on Geary between Larkin and Hyde. It’s been crazy trying to get this space open. We’re hopefully going to open in the middle of September.”
“What kind of restaurant is it?”
“A full service place. Beer and wine. Pretty small, about 25 seats. Bret Cooper from Outerlands is our consulting chef. Should be cool, a small little neighborhood spot.”
“What kind of food?”
“Ingredient driven seasonal dishes. A little bit of Japanese influence. A little northern basque influence, but San Francisco cuisine. It’s pretty rustic. They’re doing a beef short rib pot pie. They do it by hand and bake it, everything I’ve tried so far has been super good.”

“How long you been in the bay?”
“9 years, from Santa Barbara originally. I came up here for school and never left. San Francisco’s been great. It’s getting crazier now, everything is so expensive. But it’s still the greatest city in California.”
“What ways do you want to contribute to this place being so awesome?”
“Hopefully with the restaurants I’m working on. Just to create cool spaces my friends and community want to go to to add to the culture here.”

“What’s your favorite thing about your sister?”
Right - “I admire lots of qualities in her. I admire her patience, her ability to practice, her perseverance. The sense of integrity she has around what she wants to do and how she wants to do it. She has a cohesive sense creatively of what she wants to do and it doesn’t matter what other people think. I admire her sonic memory. That pertains to everything from music to words. She has an incredible capacity for language. I totally admire that she’s completely self taught. I like hanging out with her, just the two of us…talking about family. About art and politics. It’s really interesting seeing the overlaps we have, but also the gulfs of opinion. We’re really similar at times, yet so different. Comparing those things, and navigating them and learning about them.”
“And you?”
Left - “She’s really smart. She wants to get better at everything. She’s kind of addicted to self-improvement. Improving her craft. She’s a lot more forgiving than I am, that’s cool. And…she gives good head rubs.”

Right - “We’ve always been close, but we’ve always been rivals. She was blond and beautiful and when she came she took all the attention. When we were little she loved to draw and at the time all she could draw was triangles. She called them tent people. It was really cool because she understood her limitations and turned them into something creative.”

“What’s your favorite thing about your sister?”
Right - “I admire lots of qualities in her. I admire her patience, her ability to practice, her perseverance. The sense of integrity she has around what she wants to do and how she wants to do it. She has a cohesive sense creatively of what she wants to do and it doesn’t matter what other people think. I admire her sonic memory. That pertains to everything from music to words. She has an incredible capacity for language. I totally admire that she’s completely self taught. I like hanging out with her, just the two of us…talking about family. About art and politics. It’s really interesting seeing the overlaps we have, but also the gulfs of opinion. We’re really similar at times, yet so different. Comparing those things, and navigating them and learning about them.”
“And you?”
Left - “She’s really smart. She wants to get better at everything. She’s kind of addicted to self-improvement. Improving her craft. She’s a lot more forgiving than I am, that’s cool. And…she gives good head rubs.”

Right - “We’ve always been close, but we’ve always been rivals. She was blond and beautiful and when she came she took all the attention. When we were little she loved to draw and at the time all she could draw was triangles. She called them tent people. It was really cool because she understood her limitations and turned them into something creative.”

“What’s your dream for your life?”
“To live up to my potential and provide the utmost service that I can to others.”

“What are you passionate about?”
“Poetry, social justice, black people. Black people’s rights to be more exact. Human rights, but with a focus on our people.”

“I’ve always had a passion for rocks. They have healing, grounding power. Once I started recognizing my own existence I started wearing these rings.”

"Would you mmd sharing one of your poems?"
“Sure: From our compotation in the mist
Of a violent wind storm of intoxication,
I knew I would find myself moist, held
Up against a fence by your amorous disposition.

And I greeted you with an unspoken dialect
Only you could understand. In one night, with
One breath, hungry eyes met hungry hands.

Your tongue became acquainted by breaking the
Walls of my crevice, unleashing 100 ft. waves
Within me. The fluidity of passion took hold of a
Sinking blood vessel plunging into the depths of
My vitality.

We morphed into archaic creatures. I, a blood-
Sucking parasite of Hirudinea, repeatedly latching
Onto your skin as if your blood were my medicine,
I sucked you dry, yet I gave you oxygen––

To breathe, to live, for pleasure, for my satisfaction
Of you penetrating in between my thighs. Fingers
Pulling hair, I can still feel those fiery eyes, gazing
At my trembling body, deciding on what limb to feast on.

I knew then, you, a grey wolf with teeth of Canis Lupis
Was on top of me. A blood-thirsty interaction with a
Throbbing heart beat pulsating through me, into me,
Ejaculating a bitter viscid solution that left an unsavory,
Unwarranted, aftertaste for weeks.”

“I love your hair! Are you an artist?”
“No, I’m an athlete. I swim and row boats on the lake.”
“You used to or you do now?”
“I still do.”
“How old are you?”
“81.”
“What’s you secret to such good health?”
“I eat properly and I exercise. It’s that simple.”

"I have to run to dinner but come back and I’ll tell you some stories!"

“What’s your high/low of living here?”
“Everyday is both. I live on 6th st, If I go out the front of my place it’s on Market st and it’s nice. If I go out the back it’s bums everywhere, needles, shit, dead rats and shit. You got half a block and there’s hella rich people, then half a block the other way and there’s hella poor people.”

“I love to DJ. It’s fun. You get in a groove manipulating the tunes. I also make beats.”

“I like to make music, all kinds…but mostly alternative indie folk.”
“Where do you get your creative inspiration from?”
“The best and worst parts of people.”

"Are you native to the city?"
“No, I’m from Portland. You should check it out. It’s small. I feel like it’s a place you go to and you leave, but it’s a breath of fresh air while you’re there. It’s really grounded, and it’s beautiful, and everybody is so green…to the point where you can make fun of people about it. But it’s also really nice, the people feel really real.”

“What’s your dream?”
“My dream is that the city would continue to be a safe place for artists amidst all the change.”

Him - “We’ve been married 2 years and a month.”
Her - “Our first date was on a boat in the bay. We made out the whole time.”

Her - “We love to ride our motorcycle.”
Him - “Cruise.”
Her - “We like to go out to dinner a lot.”
Him - “Most of time is spent eating and drinking.”
Her - “Yep. Coffee, wine, cocktails, motorcycle.”

“I moved here for Americorps. I used to help teach non-profits technological solutions, now I help them with events management.”

“I’ve been living in San Francisco for 35 years.”
“Do you have any advice about living here?”
“Let me tell you this, I don’t care if it’s hot. I don’t care if it’s cold. We have to take anything that comes from God no matter what.”

“I used to work downtown at Geary and Stockton. I got from home to work. Work to home, but I hurt my knee so I retire now.”
“Do you have any favorite memories from your time here?”
“Oh yeah! Almost everyday.”

“My name is RRRRRRRRRRRRRR-Ricardo. I’m a Leo.”

“I’m here with the San Francisco Aids Foundation. I’m the program manager of a program called DREAAM, which stands for Determined to Respect and Encourage African American Men. I work with 18-30 year old African American gay, bi, and trans men and women. We’re putting on a ball tonight.”

“I’ve lived in the bay for 15 years. I came for the Navy in 1984.”
“What do you like to do outside of work?”
“I’m also a singer and performance artist. I haven’t done that for awhile because I was in grad school and now I’m trying to rediscover my artistic side.”

“I’m moving in a couple weeks.”
“Out of the city?”
“Yep…I’m done here.”
“How long you lived here?”
“5 years.”
“Why you moving?”
“I feel like I peaked around year 3 and it’s been just coasting since then, not downhill, I’m just ready for something new. It also sucks because I can’t move within the city I live in.”
“Because you can’t afford it?”
“Yeah, rent is fucked up.”
“So what’s the next chapter?”
“Portland.”

“What are you gonna be doing there?”
“Going to school, I’m forever going to school.”
“To study what?”
“Geography.”
“Cool, how do you want to use geography to make the world a better place?”
“I’m majoring in geographic information systems so I make maps. Whatever statistical map is necessary, I might be making that.”
“Word, good luck with the move.”

“I’m about to have my 2nd child. I’m nervous, but we’ll make it. It’s good to have siblings.”
“I’ve heard 2 isn’t twice as hard because they play with each other.”
“Oh really, I heard the opposite. That 2 isn’t like 2, it’s like 10.”
“What’s your favorite part of being a mother now?”
“Just the smiles and the love, ya know. Watching someone grow up and develop into a person. There’s just nothing as satisfying.”

“How long have you lived in the city?”
“10 years.”
“What’s your high/low of your time here?”
“Definitely the low is the weather. Trying to raise a 2 year old in this is impossible. It’s just too cold, they need to be outside running around but a lot of times it’s freezing at the park. The high is definitely going out here. There’s so much going on. I met my husband out and about and that happens here in San Francisco because people are so friendly.”

“What are you passionate about?”
“I’m passionate about education. I recruit teachers to work in low income communities across the country.”

“I moved here a month ago from Arkansas.”
“How do you want to contribute to the culture of the city?”
“I want to bring my southern charm to the West Coast.”